The Dana Foundation Publishes Free Booklet on Successful Brain Aging

Questions about learning and memory answered in scientifically vetted publication


May 20, 2015

NEWS RELEASE

May 20, 2015

Contact:
Ann Whitman
awhitman@dana.org
(212) 223-4040 x657
 
 

The Dana Foundation Publishes Free Booklet on Successful Brain Aging
Questions about learning and memory answered in scientifically vetted publication

New York, NY—Staying mentally sharp is a top priority for the aging population, and common questions include:  When is memory loss a sign of dementia? What actions can be taken to help maintain brain health? A new booklet published by the Dana Foundation gives answers to these and other memory-oriented questions in easy-to-understand language.

Staying Sharp: Successful Aging and the Brain starts at the beginning–how memories are made–and includes sections on how aging alters the brain, how learning and memory are affected, and how to lead a brain-healthy lifestyle.

It also dispels persistent myths about brain aging: How many of us have heard the brain doesn’t make new brain cells? Research in the past few years has debunked this myth, finding that new brain cells continue to be produced in certain parts of the brain, such as the hippocampus, which is associated with memory.

Alzheimer’s specialist Patrick Griffith, M.D., FAAN, Saba University School of Medicine, served as scientific adviser for Staying Sharp, and throughout the booklet, top memory experts weigh in on the latest findings. The publication is based on the Dana Foundation’s public event series, Staying Sharp, presented in partnership with AARP, where expert panels discuss ways people can improve their brain health, including their memory as they age.

Individuals can download the free PDF of Staying Sharp: Successful Aging and the Brain on the Dana Foundation website. Organizations such as senior centers can order up to 25 of the free booklets by contacting stayingsharp@dana.org.

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The Dana Foundation is a private philanthropic organization that supports brain research through grants, publications, and educational programs.

Staying Sharp is a series of public forums and educational booklets for older Americans. Since its inception in 1994, the series has been attended by more than 41,000 people in 48 cities across the United States.