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  • Patients & Caregivers

BrainWeb

BrainWeb provides information and links to validated sites about brain diseases and disorders from outside sources and from Dana publications.

 

Staying Sharp 

The Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives' Staying Sharp program includes live public forums, printed and printable resources, and videos.

Reports on Progress

Reviews by eminent neuroscientists of specific areas of research, including normal function, disease, and new technologies. 

Briefing Papers

Briefing Papers take an in-depth look at basic and timely brain-related topics, like traumatic brain injury and obesity.


Recent Articles 

 

The Brain-Games Conundrum: Does Cognitive Training Really Sharpen the Mind?

Do you misplace your keys regularly? Forget appointments? Have trouble remembering names? No worries. A host of companies promise to “train” your brain with games designed to stave off mental decline. Regardless of their effectiveness, their advertising has convinced tens of thousands of people to open their wallets. As our authors review the research on cognitive-training products, they expose the science surrounding the benefits of brain games as sketchy at best.



Environmental Influence on the Developing Brain

A panel at the recent Aspen Brain Forum discussed how certain social and psychological aspects of environment influence biology and behavior.



Nutrition and Brain Development

Speakers on an Aspen Brain Forum panel about nutrition focused on iron deficiency—the most common single nutrient deficiency in the world—and its effects on neurodevelopment.



This is Your Brain in Space

Want to travel to Mars? Bring empathy, communication skills; expect trouble with seeing, thinking—and keeping food down.



What Does it Mean to be ‘Amyloid Positive?’

Studies suggest amyloid accumulates for 3 decades or more before dementia symptoms show.



Fear and the Brain, an Introduction

Researchers are teasing out brain areas and networks that respond to threats, real and imagined.



Truth, Lies, and False Memories: Neuroscience in the Courtroom

Truth, Lies, and False Memories: Neuroscience in the Courtroom Craig Stark, Ph.D., Department of Neurobiology and Behavior, Francisco J. Ayala School of Biological Sciences, University of California, Irvine 2014-10-15 Craig Stark, Ph.D. View Article a



More Evidence That Vitamin D Protects Against Alzheimer’s

Lower vitamin D levels linked to higher dementia risk in two separate studies.



The Link Between Depression, Sleep, and Stress

 Researchers discussed the molecular mechanisms linking sleep to depression and stress at the 9th FENS Forum of Neuroscience in Milan last month.



Closing the Gap Between Cochlear Implants and Natural Hearing

Approaches include stimulating the growth of nerve fibers to improve sound perception and scanning the cortex to improve the device’s programming.



Can Hearing Loss Predict—or Lead to—Cognitive Decline?

Possible links between impaired hearing and loss of cognitive abilities raise the tantalizing possibility that restoring hearing could slow cognitive decline.



Beyond Serotonin: Depression at the microRNA Level

Researchers focusing on glutamate pathways may have found a potential biomarker for the mood disorder.



Patterning the Brain

Molecular neurobiologist Dennis O'Leary described his work during a special lecture after being awarded the European Dana Alliance for the Brain (EDAB)/ Max Cowan Prize at the 9th FENS Forum of Neuroscience.



Stem Cell Transplants Show Promise for Future Parkinson’s Treatments

Stem Cell Transplants Show Promise for Future Parkinson’s Treatments 2014-07-24 Parkinson's disease is a debilitating neurodegenerative disorder that targets dopaminergic cells in an area of the brain called the substantia nigra. Most patients are treated with the drug Levodop



An Antidepressant to Prevent Alzheimer’s?

Scientists report promising results from a small clinical trial of an SSRI drug to lower amyloid beta levels, but years of further tests lie ahead.



How Far Should Brain Researchers Go?

How much should we enhance our brains, how far should we go to treat risky pre-term pregnancies, and when can we morally do research on people having surgery for something else were among the topics at the William Safire Seminar on Neuroethics.



Obesity Linked to Changes in Brain’s White Matter Structure—and Cognition

Reducing fat levels in obese mice through exercise or surgery appears to result in better cognitive performance.