Brain Basics

Articles

Cristian Zaelzer-Perez Receives 2019 SfN Science Educator Award
Interview with Cristian Zaelzer-Perez on his work bringing scientists and artists together to enrich one another.
Stefano Sandrone Receives 2019 SfN Science Educator Award
Interview with Stefano Sandrone on how he got started in education, the importance of mentors, and more.
Centering Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence
AI pioneer Fei-Fei Li shared her vision and research at the Society for Neuroscience annual meeting in Chicago.
INS Keynote Address: Martha Farah on the Impact of SES
Martha J. Farah delivered a spirited defense of the fledgling field of neuroethics to a supportive audience on Friday, the final day of the 2019 annual meeting of the International Neuroethics Society (INS), in Chicago.
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Psychedelic Treatment for Consciousness Disorders?
If the complexity of a brain’s connections is a good measure of consciousness, and if psychedelics increase connectivity, could they help people in unconscious states like coma?
Functional Imaging of the Fetal Brain
Results from improved techniques—including finding brain tissue in a moving fetus in moving amniotic fluid—add to the argument that the seeds of some disorders are present before birth.
Growing Brains: Warnings from a Cell Line That Became Immortal
The winning entry in this year's Neuroethics Essay Contest, general-audience category, is by Sunidhi Ramesh, Sidney Kimmel Medical College Emory University
CNS Intervention in the Courtroom: An Ethical Evaluation of the Rehabilitative Potential of SSRIs
The winning entry in this year's Neuroethics Essay Contest, academic category, is by Khayla Black, New York University Shanghai
The Right to Neurotechnology: Exploring the Government’s Role on Societal Stratification in the Future of Human Enhancement
The winning entry in this year's Neuroethics Essay Contest, high-school category, is by Prithvi Nathan, Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology
art of protesters asking Am I Next?
Guns and the Mental Health Misnomer
While mass shootings continue to escalate, politics has led to the absence of solid, peer-reviewed research that will help identify individuals who might commit violent crimes. Column by Philip M. Boffey
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