Neuroethics

News and analysis on the implications of brain science

Scientists Are Totally Rethinking Animal Cognition

by Ross Anderson

The Atlantic | March 1, 2019

What science can tell us about how other creatures experience the world.

To improve mental health treatments, scientists try to dissect the pieces that make them work

by Megan Thielking

STAT News | February 1, 2019

Many patients don’t respond to treatments. Many cycle through one treatment after another without any relief, hoping to eventually land on one that works. Others find treatments that work for them — but only for awhile. And scientists don’t fully know why that’s the case. A new research push is trying to figure it out.

Assisted Suicide Gains Momentum

by Philip M. Boffey

dana.org | January 17, 2019

The Oregon law, the template for many other states, takes a restrained and responsible approach.Neuroethics column for Brain in the News.

Neuroscience & Society Curriculum

December 20, 2018

The University of Pennsylvania’s Center for Neuroscience & Society and the Franklin Institute have jointly developed a new high school curriculum on “Neuroscience and Society,” tested and refined it with practice at several schools in Philadelphia, and now offer it free to all. Their site includes multimedia resources and activities on a range of topics where neuroscience and society intersect.

Neuroethics for the National Institutes of Health BRAIN Initiative

by Diana W. Bianchi, Judith A. Cooper, Joshua A. Gordon, Jill Heemskerk, Richard Hodes, George F. Koob, Walter J. Koroshetz, David Shurtleff, Paul A. Sieving, Nora D. Volkow, James D. Churchill and Khara M. Ramos

Journal of Neuroscience | December 12, 2018

As the NIH BRAIN Initiative continues to grow and increase our understanding of the human brain and how it functions, it should increasingly rely on a robust neuroethics infrastructure to identify and address neuroethical implications of the research it funds.

The Opioids Crisis: A Balancing Act

by Philip M. Boffey

Brain in the News | December 12, 2018

How can we reduce the easy availability of opioids that is fueling the epidemic without depriving pain-wracked people of the opioid pain-killers they desperately need? Neuroethics column by Phil Boffey for Brain in the News.

Video: The Neuroethics of Advertising

International Neuroethics Society | November 30, 2018

The good news is, no mind-controlling “buy button” exists. The bad news is, as neuroscience areas such as decision-making and reward processing advance, and our personal data accumulates online, there’s no guarantee it will never exist in the future. Videocast of session from the INS annual meeting.

Not Our Problem? The Neuroethical Implications of Youth Detainment

by Jean Ngoc Boulware

International Neuroethics Society | November 28, 2018

Each year the International Neuroethics Society (INS) holds a Student/Postdoc Essay Contest. The winner in the science communication category this year is Jean Ngoc Boulware, at the University of Chicago.

Personhood: Projection or Perception?

by Elizabeth M. Ingram

International Neuroethics Society | November 28, 2018

Each year the International Neuroethics Society (INS) holds a Student/Postdoc Essay Contest. The winner in the academic category this year is Elizabeth M. Ingram, at North Carolina State University.

Duty to warn about mental status: legal requirements, patient rights, and future ethical challenges

Neuroethics Blog | November 20, 2018

"Because legislation imposing a legal duty to warn about or report on mental status places health care providers in potential jeopardy for both failure to report and breach of confidentiality, it raises numerous questions about diagnostic procedures and thresholds," writes Elaine Walker for the Neuroethics Blog.

Neuroscientists Make a Case against Solitary Confinement

by Dana G. Smith

Scientific American | November 9, 2018

At the recent Society for Neuroscience annual meeting, researchers described how social isolation can do severe, long-lasting damage to the brain.

The Neuroethics of Advertising

by Ann L. Whitman

Dana blog | November 3, 2018

The good news is, no mind-controlling “buy button” exists. The bad news is, as neuroscience areas such as decision-making and reward processing advance, and our personal data accumulates online, there’s no guarantee it will never exist in the future. We report from the International Neuroethics Society annual meeting.


Page: 1 of 6